Feeds:
Entradas
Comentarios

Posts Tagged ‘Business plan’

ModeloMejoraContinuaWordMejoraSimplificadoymassimplificado

Read Full Post »

83warrenbuffet

He leído en la web de Warren Buffet su post que, en mi opinión, ofrece un buen check list que comparto con vosotros

Check List:

  1. Reinvierta sus ganancias.
  2. Estar dispuesto a ser diferente.
  3. Nunca te chupes el dedo.
  4. Explica el trato antes de comenzar.
  5. Mira los pequeños gastos.
  6. Limita lo que pide prestado.
  7. Sé persistente.
  8. Saber cuándo abandonar.
  9. Evalúa el riesgo.
  10. Saber lo que realmente significa el éxito.

Fuente: www.warrenbuffett.com/warren-buffett-10-ways-to-get-rich/

  1. Reinvest Your Profits: When you first make money in the stock market, you may be tempted to spend it. Don’t. Instead, reinvest the profits. Warren Buffett learned this early on. In high school, he and a pal bought a pinball machine to put in a barbershop. With the money they earned, they bought more machines until they had eight in different shops. When the friends sold the venture, Warren Buffett used the proceeds to buy stocks and to start another small business. By age 26, he’d amassed $174,000 — or $1.4 million in today’s money. Even a small sum can turn into great wealth.
  2. Be Willing To Be Different: Don’t base your decisions upon what everyone is saying or doing. When Warren Buffett began managing money in 1956 with $100,000 cobbled together from a handful of investors, he was dubbed an oddball. He worked in Omaha, not Wall Street, and he refused to tell his parents where he was putting their money. People predicted that he’d fail, but when he closed his partnership 14 years later, it was worth more than $100 million. Instead of following the crowd, he looked for undervalued investments and ended up vastly beating the market average every single year. To Warren Buffett, the average is just that — what everybody else is doing. to be above average, you need to measure yourself by what he calls the Inner Scorecard, judging yourself by your own standards and not the world’s.
  3. Never Suck Your Thumb: Gather in advance any information you need to make a decision, and ask a friend or relative to make sure that you stick to a deadline. Warren Buffett prides himself on swiftly making up his mind and acting on it. He calls any unnecessary sitting and thinking “thumb sucking.” When people offer him a business or an investment, he says, “I won’t talk unless they bring me a price.” He gives them an answer on the spot.
  4. Spell Out The Deal Before You Start: Your bargaining leverage is always greatest before you begin a job — that’s when you have something to offer that the other party wants. Warren Buffett learned this lesson the hard way as a kid, when his grandfather Ernest hired him and a friend to dig out the family grocery store after a blizzard. The boys spent five hours shoveling until they could barely straighten their frozen hands. Afterward, his grandfather gave the pair less than 90 cents to split. Warren Buffett was horrified that he performed such backbreaking work only to earn pennies an hour. Always nail down the specifics of a deal in advance — even with your friends and relatives.
  5. Watch Small Expenses: Warren Buffett invests in businesses run by managers who obsess over the tiniest costs. He one acquired a company whose owner counted the sheets in rolls of 500-sheet toilet paper to see if he was being cheated (he was). He also admired a friend who painted only on the side of his office building that faced the road. Exercising vigilance over every expense can make your profits — and your paycheck — go much further.
  6. Limit What You Borrow: Living on credit cards and loans won’t make you rich. Warren Buffett has never borrowed a significant amount — not to invest, not for a mortgage. He has gotten many heart-rendering letters from people who thought their borrowing was manageable but became overwhelmed by debt. His advice: Negotiate with creditors to pay what you can. Then, when you’re debt-free, work on saving some money that you can use to invest.
  7. Be Persistent: With tenacity and ingenuity, you can win against a more established competitor. Warren Buffett acquired the Nebraska Furniture Mart in 1983 because he liked the way its founder, Rose Blumkin, did business. A Russian immigrant, she built the mart from a pawnshop into the largest furniture store in North America. Her strategy was to undersell the big shots, and she was a merciless negotiator. To Warren Buffett, Rose embodied the unwavering courage that makes a winner out of an underdog.
  8. Know When To Quit: Once, when Warren Buffett was a teen, he went to the racetrack. He bet on a race and lost. To recoup his funds, he bet on another race. He lost again, leaving him with close to nothing. He felt sick — he had squandered nearly a week’s earnings. Warren Buffett never repeated that mistake. Know when to walk away from a loss, and don’t let anxiety fool you into trying again.
  9. Assess The Risk: In 1995, the employer of Warren Buffett’s son, Howie, was accused by the FBI of price-fixing. Warren Buffett advised Howie to imagine the worst-and-bast-case scenarios if he stayed with the company. His son quickly realized that the risks of staying far outweighed any potential gains, and he quit the next day. Asking yourself “and then what?” can help you see all of the possible consequences when you’re struggling to make a decision — and can guide you to the smartest choice.
  10. Know What Success Really Means: Despite his wealth, Warren Buffett does not measure success by dollars. In 2006, he pledged to give away almost his entire fortune to charities, primarily the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He’s adamant about not funding monuments to himself — no Warren Buffett buildings or halls. “I know people who have a lot of money,” he says, “and they get testimonial dinners and hospital wings named after them. But the truth is that nobody in the world loves them. When you get to my age, you’ll measure your success in life by how many of the people you want to have love you, actually do love you. That’s the ultimate test of how you’ve lived your life.”

 

 

Read Full Post »

PHVA

Pienso que las empresas deberían tener una política establecida para personas mayores de sesenta años que ocupen puestos gerenciales o profesionales, y que deberían de dejar gradualmente responsabilidades directivas importantes.

Lo sensato, en el caso de cualquiera, no sólo del ejecutivo, es no tomar decisiones si no voy a estar ahí para ayudar a mi empresa a salir de apuros cuando esas decisiones causen problemas unos años más tarde, como generalmente sucede.

El ejecutivo más viejo debe pasar a un puesto en el que las funciones no sean las del jefe. Así él o ella se especializa y se centra en una sola contribución importante, aconsejar, enseñar, fijar estándares o resolver conflictos, más que trabajar como gerente.

Los japoneses tienen consejeros, que trabajan eficazmente, a veces hasta pasados los ochenta años.

Read Full Post »

kramerLa historia avanza en espiral, uno regresa a la posición precedente, pero a un nivel más alto, y por una senda semejante a la del sacacorchos.

Estamos de nuevo entrando en una era en la que lo importante estará en el espíritu empresarial. Sin embargo, no será la actitud empresarial de hace un siglo, o sea, la habilidad de un solo hombre para organizar un negocio que él mismo pueda manejar, controlar y abarcar. Será más bien la habilidad de crear y dirigir una organización para lo nuevo.

La historia se mueve en espiral, uno vuelve a la posición precedente, o al problema precedente, pero a un nivel más alto, y por una senda que parece la del sacacorchos. En lo empresarial esta senda nos lleva desde el nivel más bajo, ese del empresario solo, al gerente, y ahora otra vez atrás, aunque ascendiendo, a lo empresarial.

El hombre de negocios tendrá que adquirir una serie de nuevas habilidades, todas empresariales por naturaleza, pero todas ellas para ejercerlas en una organización gerencial y a través de esta.

Fuente: Peter F. Drucker.

Imagen: Tractor Kramer, similar al que me dejaban para arar en mi época joven, cuando desconocía  las “bondades” del control de gestión y la cultura empresarial.

Read Full Post »

ElPueyoEn mis primeros años de experiencia profesional en una multinacional francesa, esperaba con ilusión la aparición cada año del nuevo organigrama. Luego aprendí que el día mismo de la publicación del organigrama, éste ya era obsoleto, qué poco duraba la ilusión!!!

Después de unos años de experiencia y reflexión sobre la utilidad de los organigramas, comparto estas justificaciones para trabajar y comunicar un buen organigrama, sigue valiendo la pena tener ilusión.

Sentido y propósito. Entender para qué sirve nuestro trabajo. La mayoría de empleados sabe qué hacer, pero pocos, sabe cuál es su propósito.

Pertenencia. Sentirse parte de un equipo. Somos sociales, necesitamos no sentirnos excluidos, y que formamos parte de un equipo dentro de la empresa.

Confianza.  Puedo conseguirlo. Cuando estamos amenazados, todas las energías son para protegernos, no para dar lo mejor de nosotros mismos.

Read Full Post »

7habitosEl amigo invisible de estas Navidades del 2014 me ha traído el libro de Stephen R. Covey, Los 7 hábitos de la gente altamente efectiva.  En sus capítulos preliminares se refiere  a Esopo que contaba que un pobre  granjero descubrió un día que su gallina había puesto un reluciente huevo de oro. Primero pensó que debía tratarse de algún tipo de fraude. Pero cuando iba a deshacerse del huevo, lo pensó por segunda vez, y se lo llevó para comprobar su valor.

¡El huevo era de oro puro! El granjero no podía creer en su buena suerte. Más incrédulo aún se sintió al repetirse la experiencia. Día tras día, se despertaba y corría hacia su gallina para encontrar otro huevo de oro. Llegó a ser fabulosamente rico; todo parecía demasiado bonito para que fuera cierto.

Pero, junto con su creciente riqueza  llegaron la impaciencia y la codicia. Incapaz de  esperar día tras día los huevos de oro, el granjero decidió matar a la gallina para obtenerlos todos de una vez. Pero al abrir el ave, la encontró vacía. Allí no había huevos de oro, y ya no habría modo de conseguir ninguno más. El granjero había matado a la gallina que los producía.

El autor sugiere que en esta fábula hay una ley natural, un principio: La definición básica de la efectividad.

He tenido una reacción inmediata de estar de  acuerdo con el autor, agradecer al amigo invisible este regalo y de compartirlo con vosotros. Esta fábula me lleva a recordar infinidad de veces que en busca de la máxima efectividad hemos matado a la gallina de los huevos de  oro. Infinidad de ejemplos vienen a mi mente, os invito a compartirlos en el blog.

Read Full Post »

  • Si no hay comunicación no habrá liderazgo ni una visión compartida, por lo que no habrá un buen cambio.
  •  Comunicar al cliente interno es tan importante como comunicar al cliente externo. Hay que informar siempre a los miembros de la organización de a dónde se quiere llegar.

Las fases de la comunicación son las siguientes:

  • Explicar la necesidad: hacer partícipes a TODOS de que existe la necesidad de llevar a cabo una transformación.
  • Clarificar la visión: es necesario gestionar la resistencia al cambio.
  • Inspirar para la acción: motivar y hacer que los trabajadores acepten el cambio y sean capaces de implicarse en él.
  • Mantener el dinamismo: deben realizarse actividades de seguimiento, control y apoyo a los trabajadores.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »